Medicine Cabinet Essentials for Toddlers (1-4 Years Old)

We recommend having these items “on hand” prior to needing them. This will cut down on any middle of the night trips to the pharmacy after you speak to the pediatrician’s office and prevent having to get out of the house to run to the grocery store with a sick toddler.

**Always consult with your pediatrician before giving your child any medicine.**

I have broken it up into two sections: 12-24 Months Old and 2-4 years old.

12-24 Months Old

  • Locked Medicine Kit
  • 2-3 bottles of Infant Tylenol (Acetaminophen) – I like to have 2 bottles in my medicine cabinet and 1 in my diaper bag. Click here for Tylenol administration guidelines. Make sure to call your pediatrician because dosage is also based on weight, not just age. Your pediatrician can give you the most accurate dose based on your baby’s weight.
  • Tylenol Suppositories for infants – if you can’t get them to take their medicine orally then your pediatrician can approve Tylenol suppositories.
  • 2 liquid bottles of Benadryl (Diphenhydramine) – They can have allergic reactions to foods, pets, insects, etc. I like to keep 1 at home and 1 in the diaper bag. This is an antihistamine to mild allergic reactions. If your child ever has an allergic reaction, call your pediatrician right away. If your child has a severe reaction that impacts their breathing, call 911 right away.
  • 2 liquid bottles of Infant Motrin (Ibuprofen) – The concentration of Infant and Children are different, so make sure to check the label. Click here for Motrin administration guidelines. Make sure to call your pediatrician because dosage is also based on weight, not just age. Your pediatrician can give you the most accurate dose based on your baby’s weight.
  • Tylenol + Motrin Tip: You can alternate Tylenol and Motrin every 3 hours in babies who are 6 months old or older (so the same medication is given every 6 hours) if needed.
  • Digital Thermometer – I like to have 2 at home and 1 in my diaper bag. My favorite thermometer is by Vicks.
  • Alcohol Pads– I like to be able to clean the thermometer after each use. Plus I use them to clean my phone and headphones.
  • Aquaphor – great for dry skin or minor scrapes and can also be used as a lubricant for a rectal temp. Click here for a video demonstration on how to take a rectal temp.
  • Nose Frida – Always use in combination with normal saline nose drops. You can suction their nose 3-4 times a day.
  • Normal Saline Spray – this will help loosen thick secretions, which is so important when they have a runny noses and/or nasal congestion. If they can breathe better then they can eat and sleep better. You can use 4-5 times per day.
  • Humidifier – I love this one! I have tried a few different ones. This one has a big tank, so you don’t have to keep filling it up and it is easy to clean.
  • Probiotics – this is good to have on hand if baby has to be on antibiotics.
  • Glycerin Suppositories – inserted rectally for constipation, which will help with their gas pains and help them poop. Check out the Moms on Call 6-15 Months Book (linked below) for tips on how to help your baby feel better and relieve gas pains when it comes to constipation and kids who are infrequent stoolers (there is a difference between the two).
  • Medicine Dosage Syringes – make sure to have 1 in your diaper bag with the Tylenol and thermometer.
  • Zarbee’s Naturals Cough Syrup + Mucus – Always consult with your pediatrician before giving your child any homeopathic cough syrup.
  • Zarbee’s Naturals Children’s Complete Daytime Cough Syrup* + Immune – Always consult with your pediatrician before giving your child any homeopathic cough syrup.
  • Pedialyte – this will rehydrate and replenish electrolytes. If it isn’t open, you can store it on the shelf or in the fridge. If it is open, you must store in fridge. You can even make your own Pedialyte popsicles with Silicone Ice Pop Molds or Disposable Ice Popsicle Mold Bags. You can also buy them already made, Pedialyte Popsicles.
  • Vomit Bags
  • Moms on Call 6-15 Months Book – it is written by two pediatric nurses with over 20 years of experience and moms. They include a common illness sections – what to do when baby gets sick during the day verses night, when to call the pediatrician, and so much more!
  • Desitin and Aquaphor – this is my favorite remedy for a diaper rash. Layer Desitin on their bottom, like you are frosting a cake. We want a very thick barrier (1/4 inch thick). It is a lot more than what most parents think. Next, apply Aquaphor (again, like you are frosting a cake) on top of the Desitin this creates a barrier to protect their bottom, so it can heal. When you change the next diaper, there should still be a good amount of visible diaper cream on the skin. You can clean the genital area very well at the changing station before bath time with a warm wash cloth or baby wipe. We do not use soap on the genital area. Throughout the day you want to keep the diaper ointment lathered on well to create the barrier to help their bottom heal.

2-4 Years Old

At 2 years old, they can now have Children’s Tylenol and Children’s Motrin. The concentration of Infant and Children are different, so make sure to check the label.

  • Locked Medicine Kit
  • 2-3 bottles of Children’s Tylenol (Acetaminophen). They can now have Children’s Tylenol Chewable Tablets. I like to have 2 bottles in my medicine cabinet and 1 in my mini first aid kit in my purse. Click here for Tylenol administration guidelines. Make sure to call your pediatrician because dosage is also based on weight, not just age. Your pediatrician can give you the most accurate dose based on your child’s weight.
  • Tylenol Suppositories for children 6-36 months old.
  • Tylenol Suppositories for children 3-6 years old. If you can’t get them to take their medicine orally then your pediatrician can approve Tylenol suppositories.
  • 2 liquid bottles of Benadryl (Diphenhydramine) – They can have allergic reactions to foods, pets, insects, etc. I like to keep 1 at home and 1 in my mini first aid kit in my purse. This is an antihistamine to mild allergic reactions. If your child ever has an allergic reaction, call your pediatrician right away. If your child has a severe reaction that impacts their breathing, call 911 right away.
  • 2 liquid bottles of Children’s Motrin (Ibuprofen) – They can now have Children’s Motrin Chewable Tablets. Click here for Motrin administration guidelines. Make sure to call your pediatrician because dosage is also based on weight, not just age. Your pediatrician can give you the most accurate dose based on your baby’s weight.
  • Tylenol + Motrin Tip: You can alternate Tylenol and Motrin every 3 hours in babies who are 6 months old or older (so the same medication is given every 6 hours) if needed.
  • Children’s Zyrtec – for seasonal allergies.
  • Benadryl Anti-Itch Relief Cream
  • Digital Thermometer – I like to have 2 at home and 1 in my mini first aid kit that I keep in my purse. My favorite thermometer is by Vicks.
  • Alcohol Pads– I like to be able to clean the thermometer after each use. Plus I use them to clean my phone and headphones.
  • Aquaphor – great for dry skin or minor scrapes and can also be used as a lubricant for a rectal temp. Click here for a video demonstration on how to take a rectal temp.
  • Normal Saline Spray – this will help loosen thick secretions, which is so important when they have a runny noses and/or nasal congestion. If they can breathe better then they can eat and sleep better. You can use 4-5 times per day.
  • Humidifier – I love this one! I have tried a few different ones. This one has a big tank, so you don’t have to keep filling it up and it is easy to clean.
  • For my daughter, I use a 2-in-1 multivitamin and probiotic everyday, Plexus XFactor Kids. XFactor Kids (age 2+) provides essential nutrition for healthy growth, supports strong immune and digestive systems, and healthy brain function.
  • Glycerin Suppositories age 2 to 5 years old – inserted rectally for constipation.
  • Medicine Dosage Syringes and Cups– make sure to have 1-2 in your diaper bag with the Tylenol and thermometer.
  • Zarbee’s Naturals Cough Syrup + Mucus – Always consult with your pediatrician before giving your child any homeopathic cough syrup.
  • Zarbee’s Naturals Children’s Complete Daytime Cough Syrup + Immune – Always consult with your pediatrician before giving your child any homeopathic cough syrup.
  • Zarbee’s Naturals Children’s Complete Cough Syrup + Mucous Nighttime
  • Pedialyte – this will rehydrate and replenish electrolytes. If it isn’t open, you can store it on the shelf or in the fridge. If it is open, you must store in fridge. You can even make your own Pedialyte popsicles with Silicone Ice Pop Molds or Disposable Ice Popsicle Mold Bags. You can also buy them already made, Pedialyte Popsicles.
  • Vomit Bags
  • Moms on Call 6-15 Months Book – it is written by two pediatric nurses with over 20 years of experience and moms. They include a common illness sections – what to do when baby gets sick during the day verses night, when to call the pediatrician, and so much more! My daughter is 4 years old and I still refer to it when she gets sick.
  • Once they are 4 years old, they can have Vick’s Children Cough Congestion Daytime medicine – for cough, chest congestion and runny nose.